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Researchers Develop Techniques to Track the Activity of a Potent Cancer Gene in Individual Cells

MYC is one of the most potent cancer genes, contributing to almost every kind of cancer—yet it is still not known how it causes tumors to form. Though higher levels of MYC are present in a wide range of tumor types, MYC alone does not usually lead to tumors.

Simona Patange, a Ph.D. candidate in biophysics with the UMD-NCI Partnership for Integrative Cancer Research in Daniel Larson’s lab at the National Cancer Institute, is using novel tools to track MYC and its activity in individual cells. Patange will present their latest developments at the 63rd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, to be held March 2 - 6, 2019 in Baltimore, Maryland.

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